Fall is the most wonderful time of year!

 Members of the math.epi.lab at the end of the Centre for Public Health and Zoonosis Annual Research Symposium in June 2018. From left to right: Elissa Giang, Dr. Amy Greer, Melanie Cousins, Emma Gardner, Wendy Xie, and Roksolana Hovdey. 

Members of the math.epi.lab at the end of the Centre for Public Health and Zoonosis Annual Research Symposium in June 2018. From left to right: Elissa Giang, Dr. Amy Greer, Melanie Cousins, Emma Gardner, Wendy Xie, and Roksolana Hovdey. 

With fall comes the start (continuation?) of the academic travel season. Are you wondering where you might find members of the math.epi.lab this fall? We will be presenting our most recent research findings in Canada, the US, and Thailand so we will be "in transit" quite a bit this fall. Be sure to catch up with us if you are planning to attend any of the following conferences and events.

1) 2018 Calgary International Equine Symposium (Sept 2018)

2) Pandemic Influenza Outbreak Research Modelling (Pan-Inform) meeting (Oct 2018)

3) 15th International Symposium of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics: ISVEE15 (Nov 2018)

4) Conference for Research Workers in Animal Diseases (Dec 2018)

New paper out from Luz Kisiel on dog population control

Dog count 1.JPG

Photo credit: Luz Maria Kisiel

photo_Luz.jpg

Congratulations to Luz and team on the publication of her second MSc thesis research paper. This is a great example of how models can be used to model dog population dynamics and then use the model to look at different surgical and non-surgical population control interventions. Spoiler alert: if you are running a surgical dog population control program and have limited resources the model suggests that changing your focus to young, female dogs exclusively is more effective in the long run than focusing on mixed groups of dogs. You can read more here

 Photo credit: Luz Maria Kisiel

Photo credit: Luz Maria Kisiel

2017 AAAS Golden Goose Award for Dr. Joyce Longcore

 Dr. Joyce Longcore. Photo courtesy of the University of Maine.

Dr. Joyce Longcore. Photo courtesy of the University of Maine.

This morning I arrived at the office to an email from my doctoral supervisor Dr. Jim Collins at Arizona State University (ASU). The email had been sent to a long list of current and past collaborators of the lab all of whom have worked on or are currently working on research questions related to amphibian decline. The email was to inform us that last night in Washington, Dr. Joyce Longcore, Elaine Lamirande, Dr. Don Nichols and Dr. Allan Pessier, were awarded the 2017 AAAS Golden Goose Award. The award celebrates scientific success stories and Dr. Longcore and the other awardees are the perfect example of a great team doing some wonderful investigative work. 

Jim's email was also a reminder to me of how fortunate I was to complete my graduate training at ASU being mentored by Jim. As a member of his team, I also had the ability to interact with a large network of scientists, and graduate students from across the country that were all a part of a large, NSF funded Integrated Research Challenges in Environmental Biology (IRCEB) project focused on amphibian decline (Dr. Longcore was one of those scientists). It serves as an important reminder to me how experiences, conversations, and being treated as a colleague even when you are a graduate student can really shape the experience of graduate students. I have very fond memories of my time at ASU and the wonderful training environment in which I was "raised". Jim Collins, Elizabeth Davidson and the rest of the IRCEB team were all a huge part of that and seeing Dr. Longcore receive such a prestigious award in recognition of her work in the area of amphibian decline was a really wonderful surprise for a Thursday morning. 

Luz met PM Justin Trudeau at a meeting in Ottawa this week.

 Luz managed to get a selfie with our PM Justin Trudeau after the discussion.

Luz managed to get a selfie with our PM Justin Trudeau after the discussion.

The math.epi.lab's very own Luz Kisiel was invited to travel to Ottawa to participate in a discussion with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada and President Enrique Peña Nieto on Tuesday, June 28, during the Mexican leader's state visit to Canada.

Luz has conducted research in Mexico looking at owned, and free-roaming dog population dynamics as well as rabies vaccination programs within the State of Hidalgo, Mexico. She was invited to participate in a discussion about collaborative research partnerships and opportunities for students in Canada and Mexico. 

The discussion was held at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa and was moderated by Dr. Ingrid Bejerman, Coordinator for the Canada in the Americas Initiative (CITA) at the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. 

The Math.Epi.Lab at the Canadian Association of Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

The CAVEPM conference rotates between the Canadian veterinary colleges and this year the meeting was hosted here at the Ontario Veterinary College. Our group presented three oral presentation and three posters. It was also a great way for our new summer students to begin their summer research experience. 

 Enjoying a sunny lunch outside on the lawn. Just missing Gabrielle and Emma.

Enjoying a sunny lunch outside on the lawn. Just missing Gabrielle and Emma.

 Kelsey starting her talk on equine networks. 

Kelsey starting her talk on equine networks. 

 Luz giving a great talk about her field work in Mexico. 

Luz giving a great talk about her field work in Mexico.