New paper out from Luz Kisiel on dog population control

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Photo credit: Luz Maria Kisiel

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Congratulations to Luz and team on the publication of her second MSc thesis research paper. This is a great example of how models can be used to model dog population dynamics and then use the model to look at different surgical and non-surgical population control interventions. Spoiler alert: if you are running a surgical dog population control program and have limited resources the model suggests that changing your focus to young, female dogs exclusively is more effective in the long run than focusing on mixed groups of dogs. You can read more here

Photo credit: Luz Maria Kisiel

Photo credit: Luz Maria Kisiel

CIHR Impact Fellows Retreat

This week Dr. Salah Uddin Khan, Dr. Victoria Ng (Public Health Agency of Canada), and I had the great pleasure of attending the first CIHR Health Systems Impact Fellows Cohort Retreat in Toronto. Salah was awarded this prestigious postdoctoral award in the summer and began his fellowship in collaboration with the National Microbiology Laboratory this fall. The goal of these fellowships is to train PhD graduates in a way that focuses on both research and core competencies (such as project management, leadership, and change management) so that they can progress in their careers as leaders within the Canadian Health System. This was the first cohort retreat and it was a really excellent experience for both the fellows and their academic and organizational sponsors. I met many really interesting fellows who I expect will go on to do great things for the Canadian Healthcare system. One of the really amazing things about the inaugural HSI cohort? 80% of the fellows are women!  I am looking forward to the next retreat in spring 2018. 

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Do you aspire to be a "future veterinarian?"

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

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We are currently recruiting undergraduate students interested in helping out with a large equine research project that will be running from November until the Christmas break 2017. No horse experience is necessary. This is a great opportunity for students interested in a career in veterinary medicine to learn more about veterinary research and get some experience working in a large animal (equine) environment. You will be providing technical and logistical support to the study coordinator, Dr. Tanya Rossi. Please contact Dr. Amy Greer in the Department of Population Medicine to learn more about this opportunity. 

Recruitment and data collection for our newest study is underway

Yesterday Rachael, Beatrice, and Enise were out conducting a farm visit! They are collecting all of the preliminary information we need from the farms that are participating in our new equine contact network study. If you are a horse or farm owner who is interested in participating in our new study please contact us. We would love to speak with you about the project. 

A blog post from Enise about her trip with World Vets

From June 29 to July 6, I had the chance to volunteer with World Vets in Granada, Nicaragua. World Vets is an organization which provides free veterinary services to pet owners in developing countries. The days were packed with hours spent at the World Vets clinic; around 250 cats/dogs and 80 horses were helped by our team in the form of vaccinations, deworming, spay/neuter and physical exams. In our spare time, we got to experience the beautiful city of Granada: the food, music, salsa dancing and volcanos. It was so rewarding to be able to travel, learn and help the local community!  

Here is a photo of myself and two friends (also from the University of Guelph) holding up our flag on Canada Day in Nicaragua.

Here is a photo of myself and one of the cutest patients of the clinic, Christian the puppy.