New Paper Out From Mathepilab Member Emma Gardner!

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a zoonotic disease transmitted from dromedary camels to people, which can result in outbreaks with human-to-human transmission. Emma’s paper estimated the force of infection of MERS-CoV within camel populations in order to improve our understanding of MERS-CoV dynamics in camels raised outside of the Middle East. Congratulations Emma!

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The Second Annual International Equine Symposium

Earlier this month, Amy travelled to Calgary to share the final results of our equine network and biosecurity project with colleagues at the second annual International Equine Symposium. The symposium was chock full of the most exciting discoveries and innovation in all areas of equine health research! It was a great way to interact with equine practitioners, researchers and students and culminated in an evening at Spruce Meadows to watch the 6-bar jumping event. What a fantastic event!

Photo courtesy of Amy Greer

Photo courtesy of Amy Greer

Congratulations to former mathepilab member Dr. Kelsey Spence!

Kelsey’s research characterizing the movement network of horses in Ontario has been published in PLOS ONE! The results indicated that horses did not travel to the same locations each month, and the most connected locations varied between consecutive months. These results support the need to better understand the variety of locations to which horses can travel in Ontario, as different types of locations may have different associated risks of disease spread.

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Hot in Switzerland!

Photo courtesy of Elissa Giang

Photo courtesy of Elissa Giang

Mathepilab member Elissa Giang sweated it out in Bern during Switzerland’s record-breaking heat wave last month! Elissa was in Bern to attend the 17th International Conference on Production Diseases in Farm Animals, where she gave an oral presentation of her research findings focusing on production-limiting diseases in swine and the use of mathematical models to simulate management-driven control strategies for reducing disease burden in the nursery.

It’s hard to feel sorry for her though…look at that view!

Photo courtesy of Elissa Giang

Photo courtesy of Elissa Giang

Photo courtesy of Elissa Giang

Photo courtesy of Elissa Giang

And that beach!

Sharing our research activities with colleagues at CAVEPM.

Earlier in the spring, the Canadian Veterinary Epidemiology community gathered in Saint-Hyacinthe, QC for the annual conference of the Canadian Association for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine (CAVEPM). This year our group contributed five oral presentations (Wendy Xie, Elissa Giang, Roksolona Hovdey, Salah Uddin Kahn, Dylan Melmer). We also learned about navigating our way through information overload in the era of big data.

 
Photo courtesy of Amy Greer

Photo courtesy of Amy Greer

Salah discussing his work navigating an overwhelming amount of climate data to project the ecological niche of two different types of mosquitoes in Canada and the US.

 

Roxy presenting the results from her mathematical modeling study assessing the impact of person-to-person transmission during an outbreak of Verotoxin-producing E. coli.

Photo courtesy of Amy Greer

Photo courtesy of Amy Greer

We are looking for a new PhD student with an interest in horses!

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PhD student  - Equine Network Epidemiology and Biosecurity (ENEBT)  Team 

The Mathematical Epidemiology Laboratory, University of Guelph

Application Deadline: June 30, 2019

 Applications are invited for a PhD position in veterinary epidemiology and mathematical modeling in the Mathematical Epidemiology Laboratory (www.mathepilab.org) at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph. The successful applicant will be involved in a research program that will apply quantitative methods to the area of equine infection control and biosecurity. The project will be co-supervised by Dr. Amy Greer and Dr. Terri O’Sullivan who co-lead the ENEB team at the Ontario Veterinary College. 

 

Applicants should have significant experience in veterinary medicine, epidemiology, and/or population health. The successful candidate will have excellent English language communication skills (both verbal and written), strong analytical skills, and experience conducting research in a highly interdisciplinary environment. Prior experience with R and working with horses and/or horse owners would be considered an asset. Preference will be given to applicants who also hold a DVM degree and who have experience working with veterinary professionals in a research environment. 

The starting date is September 2019 (contingent on funding), or as soon as possible thereafter.All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Incomplete applications will not be considered and only selected applicants will be contacted for an interview.

 How to apply:

Applicants should first review the Graduate Studies website to ensure that they meet the requirements for admission to our graduate program (https://www.uoguelph.ca/graduatestudies/).  Applicants must submit a cover letter that specifically addresses the applicants interest in equine epidemiology and biosecurity, a recent curriculum vitae, and a copy of their academic transcript (unofficial is fine). Applicants should also submit contact information for at least two individuals who can provide letters of recommendation to Dr. Amy Greer.